E-cigarettes may become one of the most effective smoking cessation tools

On March 10, a new study published by King’s College London, UK emphasized that daily use of e-cigarettes has “significant results” in helping to quit smoking. At the same time, the study compared other smoking cessation methods including nicotine replacement therapy or medication. This research provides support for the effectiveness of e-cigarettes to help quit smoking.

Although the number of smokers in the UK has been declining in recent years, smoking is still the leading cause of premature death and disease-nearly 75,000 people in the UK lost their lives in 2019. In a study funded by Cancer Research UK (Cancer Research UK), researchers at King’s College London analyzed online survey data from more than 1,155 people, including smokers and former smokers who quit smoking less than a year before completing the survey , And e-cigarette users. A total of five rounds of data were collected from 2012 to 2017. The researchers analyzed the smokers who had smoked for at least one month during the follow-up period and those who had quit smoking for at least one month between the first survey and the follow-up survey to explore the effectiveness of e-cigarettes in helping to quit smoking.

This study found that smokers who use e-cigarettes every day are more than five times more likely to quit smoking than those who do not use smoking cessation aids at all. Daily use of e-cigarettes is also more effective than other evidence-based smoking cessation methods-including nicotine replacement therapy, medications (such as bupropion or varenicline or any combination of these auxiliary drugs). Compared with not using auxiliary tools at all, these methods have nothing to do with smoking cessation during the follow-up period.

Research results show that users who use e-cigarettes every day are more likely to quit smoking than those who do not use smoking cessation aids at all, indicating that e-cigarettes are a more effective way to quit smoking than nicotine replacement therapy and prescription drug treatment. Dr. Leonie Brose, Research Associate Professor of the National Addiction Centre at King’s College London, said: “Although the World Health Organization (WHO) is cautious about e-cigarettes, our research shows that e-cigarettes are still one of the most effective smoking cessation tools currently available. “

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